Feb 1, 2016

Clint Eastwood Blasts Oscar Boycott as Charlotte Rampling Defends Her Comments Calling the Backlash "Anti-White"

via DavidDuke.com

I need to preface everything I say about this on-going Oscars controversy by stating that I despite Hollywood. If it weren’t for intercontinental flights, I would hardly see any movies at all. This latest uproar about the “whiteness” of the Oscars is so ridiculous given the thorough Jewish domination of Hollywood and the easily documented hostility of the Jewish elite towards the white European race.

In general, I would just rather ignore Hollywood, but given its prominence in society, I need to point out a few things regarding the controversy. First, while I am pleased that at least some movie stars speaking out against the proposed boycott of the Oscars and even condemning its anti-white nature, predictably none of the spoiled and pampered sell-out white actors dares mention the fact that Hollywood is not run by white Europeans, but rather by Jews.

The reaction of much of the black contingent in Hollywood is utterly reprehensible. They have been so inculcated in a culture of both victimhood and privilege that they assume there should be a black quota for every endevor, regardless of effort or merit.

Similarly, if they are over-represented in the prison system, the ranks of the unemployed, or the welfare rolls, the only possible explanation can be systemic racism.

You constantly hear blacks and their pretend allies in the media calling for a discussion about race, but the fact is that any honest discussion about race would expose too many realities that they would prefer continue to be ignored. Perhaps the indignation of a few otherwise pampered white Hollywood goyim can spark a reality check.

Daily Mail
  • Clint Eastwood says majority of people in the Academy do not win awards
  • Charlotte Rampling said calls for more minority nominees were ‘anti-white’
  • Chelsea Clinton blasted Rampling as ‘outrageous, ignorant and offensive’
  • Rampling is nominated for Best Actress for her work in 45 Years 
  • She gave a radio interview in Paris on Friday attacking the Oscar boycott
  • She later released a statement saying comments were ‘misinterpreted’ 
  • The ‘White Oscars’ row began when Jada Pinkett Smith and Spike Lee announced their intention to boycott the ceremony on Monday 
  • Will Smith and Michael Moore have both since decided not to attend 
  • Many others in Hollywood have joined the debate including Sir Michael Caine, Reese Witherspoon, Idris Elba and Mark Ruffalo
Clint Eastwood has blasted the Oscar race row as actress Charlotte Rampling defended her comments calling the backlash ‘anti-white’.

When asked what he thought about the controversy surrounded Hollywood’s biggest awards show, Eastwood told TMZ he didn’t know anything about it.

The 85-year-old then added: ‘All I know is there’s thousands of people in the Academy and a lot of them, the majority of them, haven’t won Oscars.’

Eastwood isn’t one of the majority, however, having won four Academy Awards during his lengthy career – Best Director and Best Picture in 2005 for Million Dollar Baby and Best Director and Best Picture in 1993 for Unforgiven.

But he slammed those calling for a boycott of the ceremony after no non-white actors were nominated in the acting categories for the second year in a row, adding: ‘A lot of people are crying, I guess.’ 


‘A lot of people are crying’: When asked about the Oscars controversy, Clint Eastwood blasted those calling for a boycott

Meanwhile, Rampling entered the debate early on Friday saying that plans to boycott the Oscars were misguided and calls to get more minority nominees were ‘anti-white racism’.

Ms Rampling’s entrance into the row was notable as she is one of this year’s nominees and is shortlisted for Best Actress for her role in 45 Years.

But she released a statement Friday evening however saying that her comments had been ‘misinterpreted.’

Chelsea Clinton launched a scathing attack on Rampling on Friday in anger over her comments and took to Twitter to blasted the veteran actress and Oscar nominee.
Clinton called her standpoint ‘outrageous, ignorant and offensive’.

Many on Twitter rallied to the actress’ side after Clinton’s swipe.

One user wrote: ‘Why? Because she has an opinion that’s not the same as yours. All sides should be heard with respect’.

Another added: ‘What Charlotte Rampling said was absolutely correct. It’s progressives like yourself who refuse to recognise it.’

The British star, 69, said such politically correct thinking was a form of racism in itself.

Speaking on Europe 1 radio station in Paris, where she now lives, Ms Rampling said: ‘It’s anti-white racism. Maybe black actors don’t deserve to be on the final stretch?’Rampling, who first made her name in classic films including Georgy Girl in the 1960s, said she was also opposed to quotas being introduced to promote black actors.

‘Why classify people?’ she said. ‘They feel like a minority, they think: “We’re the black actors and there are not enough of us.’

Referring to the vanity of some actors in general, Ms Rampling added: ‘There will always be problems – he’s too handsome, he’s too black, he’s too white…’

She released a statement to CBS Sunday Morning soon after, saying; ‘I regret that my comments could have been misinterpreted this week in my interview with Europe 1 Radio.

Misinterpreted? Charlotte Rampling is up for her first Oscar for 45 Years, seen here.  During a Friday radio interview on Europe 1 radio station in Paris, where she now lives, Ms Rampling said of the boycott: ‘It’s anti-white racism’

‘I simply meant to say that in an ideal world every performance will be given equal opportunities for consideration. I am very honored to be included in this year’s wonderful group of nominated actors and actresses.’

Her views seemed to be supported by Sir Michael Caine, who spoke out against race coming into the nomination process.

He told the BBC: ‘There’s loads of black actors. In the end you can’t vote for an actor because he’s black. You can’t say ‘I’m going to vote for him, he’s not very good, but he’s black, I’ll vote for him’.

‘You have to give a good performance and I’m sure people have. I saw Idris Elba (in Beasts Of No Nation)… I thought he was wonderful.’

The two-time Academy Award-winner also said black actors should ‘be patient’.

‘Of course it will come. It took me years to get an Oscar, years,’ he added. ‘The best thing about it is you don’t have to go. Especially the Oscars, 24 hours on an aeroplane and I’ve got to sit there clapping Leonardo DiCaprio.

‘I love Leonardo, he played my son in a movie, but I’m too old to travel that far and sit in an audience and clap someone else.’

Meanwhile, actress Ellen Page – who was nominated for a Best Actress Oscar for her role in 2008’s Juno has taken the opposite stance, insisting the situation is a ‘reflection of the industry’ as a whole.

She told The Wrap: ‘It’s awful, and I think what just happened in regards to the nominations two years in a row is a reflection of the industry itself, and the lack of diversity in all positions.

‘I feel like we all have to be doing what we can to make a change, because we’re supposed to be telling stories that reflect human experience, and we can’t just be showing one group of people.’

The new comments came as the Academy rushed to announce new rules to counter the criticism.

They pledged to double the number of female and minority members by 2020, and will immediately diversify its leadership by adding three new seats to its board of governors.

Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs announced the changes on Friday.

‘The Academy is going to lead and not wait for the industry to catch up,’ she said in a statement.

Other changes include limiting members’ voting status to a period of 10 years, to be extended only if the individual remains active in film during that decade.

'Spoiled brats': Prouder Gerald Molen, pictured left, collecting his Oscar for Shindler's List has blasted plans for an Oscars boycott. He is pictured with Steven Spielberg and Branko Lusting
‘Spoiled brats’: Prouder Gerald Molen, pictured left, collecting his Oscar for Shindler’s List has blasted plans for an Oscars boycott. He is pictured with Steven Spielberg and Branko Lusting


Lifetime voting rights will be granted only to Academy Award nominees and winners, and to members after three ten-year voting terms.

Previously, all active members received lifetime voting rights.

The organization also plans to diversify its leadership beyond the board of governors by adding new members to key decision-making committees, and further diversify its membership with a global campaign to identify and recruit diverse talent.

Reaction came swiftly.

On Saturday, Silence Of The Lambs director Jonathan Demme called for even more immediate action by the Academy.

Writing on Deadline.com, Demme, who won a best Director Academy Award for the 1991 movie, said changes should be implemented straightaway for this year’s round of voting.

‘It’s exciting that the Academy has responded so swiftly and openly with an admission of the white male dominance of our films, our industry, and our awards,’ he wrote in an opinion piece published Saturday.

‘Wouldn’t it be so wise, and so very correct, to not wait for next year to address this enormous challenge/problem?’

Demme, 71, went on: ‘Instead, let’s recalibrate this years votes, expanding the entries in all categories, and in this way make it possible for us all to actually watch what is presently — unwatchably — so mortifyingly the ‘best white whatever’ in all categories of the 2016 Oscar ceremony.’

The director, who also helmed Philadelphia, starring Denzel Washington and Tom Hanks, and Meryl Streeps’ Ricki And The Flash, also suggested that members of the Academy should be required to watch all the films released during a year before voting.

Ava DuVernay, director of last year’s best picture-nominee ‘Selma,’ tweeted that the changes were ‘one good step in a long, complicated journey for people of color and women artists.’

She added: ‘Shame is a helluva motivator.’

The diversity issue has been dividing Hollywood all week and looks set to dominate discussions surrounding the Chris Rock hosted ceremony scheduled for February 28.

Black stars fail to feature on any of the four lead and supporting acting categories. It follows a 2015 shortlist which was equally homogeneous.

The only black projects nominated for an Oscar – What Happened, Miss Simone? for documentary and Straight Outta Compton for screenplay – have all white nominees.

Jada Pinkett Smith publicly addressed the issue with a video on her Facebook page which helped kick-start the debate about this year’s lack of diversity.

The Magic Mike XXL star said she would not attend the ceremony over the issue.

‘I can’t help ask the question: is it time that people of color, recognize how much power and influence we have amassed that we no longer need to ask to be invited anywhere,’ she said.

‘I ask the question have we now come to a new time and place, where we recognize that we can no longer beg for the love, acknowledgement or respect of any group.

‘That maybe it is time that we love, respect and acknowledge ourselves in the way we are asking others to do, then that that is the place of true power. I’m simply asking the question.

‘Here is what I believe, the Academy has the right to acknowledge whomever they choose, to invite whomever they choose and now, I think that it is our responsibility now, to make the change.’

Her husband Will backed her in an appearance on Good Morning America on Thursday.

‘I think that diversity is the American superpower. That’s why we’re great,’ he told Robin Roberts in the exclusive interview.

‘So many different people from so many different places adding their ideas, their inspirations, their influences to this beautiful American gumbo. … so when I look at the series of nominations of the Academy, it is not reflecting that beauty.’

Since the Hollywood power couple came to the fore, numerous other stars have spoken out.

However, Michael Moore and Spike Lee are the only two to go as far as backing the boycott.

Lee said the ‘real battle’ against racism was taking place in the ‘executive office of the Hollywood studios and TV and cable networks.’

‘This is where the gate keepers decide what gets made and what gets jettisoned to “turnaround” or scrap heap,’ he wrote to his combined 1.4 million followers on social media.

The Chi-Raq director then pointed out that it’s easier for an African-American to be President of the United States ‘than be president of a Hollywood studio.’
Lee then suggested that the powers that be should follow in the footsteps of the NFL football league, whose Rooney Rule states that minorities must be interviewed for major positions.

Other stars have added their voices to the debate but will still attend the star-studded event.

William H Macy, who is one of the stars of this year’s Best Picture nominee ‘Room’, claimed some Academy voters don’t even watch the films in contention – and instead vote for actors they personally favor.

Oscar winner Danny Boyle also spoke about the controversy on Thursday and said that ceremonies and cinemagoers should not judge talent on skin color.

Macy, who is a member of the Academy, told Mail Online: ‘My take on this story is that there is no conspiracy, it is the Academy. It is mostly a bunch of white guys.

‘And I am guilty of it too. We gravitate to our own.

‘The only thing that the Academy needs to fix is that a lot of people that vote for it don’t see all of the movies, so you vote for the guy you liked last year… “I didn’t see this film – but I always liked that guy, or I liked that woman!”

‘I think we need we need more diversity in the Academy is the way to fix this.’

When asked about the possibility of quotas being introduced to award nominations though, Macy said: ‘That is a stupid idea.’

He then reiterated: ‘That is stupid idea to have quotas, because what if there aren’t seven white guys that didn’t do a good job?

‘You have to have four white guys, four black guys – no. It is all about the work.

‘The problem is the Academy. One of the things I get about the award shows when I go in is that I know these people, some of them owe me money… it is real.

‘If you win one of these years it is your peers, they really voted for you. So it is the make-up of the Academy that is the only problem.’

Academy Award winner and member Reese Witherspoon weighed in on Friday.

‘So disappointed that some of 2015’s best films, filmmakers and performances were not recognized… Nothing can diminish the quality of their work, but these filmmakers deserve recognition.

As an Academy member, I would love to see a more diverse voting membership,’ she wrote on Facebook.

Director Danny Boyle meanwhile said that the actors in his films ‘play human beings. There is only race..the human race.’

He also added that he believes this scandal will change matters moving forward.

‘I think everybody acknowledges that everything evolves and changes. It is going to evolve and change more, you can see that coming.

‘I have been very lucky to work in my career with a lot of actors from many different backgrounds and ethnicities and I am really proud of that.’

Boyle expressed his surprise at Creed not receiving attention from the Academy for its black director Ryan Coogler or actor Michael B. Jordan and just a nomination for the film’s white star, Sylvester Stallone.

‘I thought that Ryan Coogler did a wonderful job in Creed, which is wonderful, really enjoyable movie and I was very impressed.

‘There are wonderful shining lights out there which will find their way through.’

Two-time Academy Award winner George Clooney said he believed Hollywood as an industry was ‘moving in the wrong direction.’

‘If you think back 10 years ago, the Academy was doing a better job. Think about how many more African Americans were nominated…. And all of a sudden, you feel like we’re moving in the wrong direction,’ the 54-year-old actor and director said.

Oscar nominee Don Cheadle weighed in on the debate with a Twitter joke directed at this year’s host Chris Rock.

‘Yo, Chris. Come check me out at #TheOscars this year. They got me parking cars on G level,’ he wrote.

Lupita Nyong’o, who won the Oscar for Best Supporting Actress in 2014 for her performance in 12 Years a Slave, wrote on Instagram; ‘I am disappointed by the lack on inclusion in this year’s Academy Award nominations.

‘It has me thinking about unconscious prejudice and what merits prestige in our culture.’

‘This institution doesn’t reflect its president and it doesn’t reflect this room. I am an Academy member and it doesn’t reflect me, and it doesn’t reflect this nation,’ – David Oyelowo

‘You have to ask the question – are black people normally playing petty criminals? Are women always the love interest or talking about men? Are gay people always stereotyped? Are disabled people ever seen at all?’ – Idris Elba

‘… the idea that we could go two years in a row, where 40 actors could be nominated and none of them were black, is just crazy,’ – Michael Moore

‘I can’t help ask the question: is it time that people of color, recognize how much power and influence we have amassed that we no longer need to ask to be invited anywhere,’ – Jada Pinkett Smith

‘How is it possible for the 2nd consecutive year all 20 contenders under the actor category are white? And let’s not even get into the other branches. 40 white actors in 2 years and no flava at all. We can’t act?! WTF!!’ – Spike Lee

‘Hollywood is like the Rocky Mountains, the higher up you get the whiter it gets and this year’s Academy Awards will be yet another Rocky Mountain Oscar,’ – Rev Al Sharpton

‘Somebody asked was I gonna watch the mother****ing Oscars. F*** no! What the f*** am I gonna watch that bulls*** for? They ain’t got no n***** nominated. All these great movies and all this great s*** ya’ll keep stealing from us. F*** you! F*** you!’ – Snoop Dog to TMZ

‘Why is this a conversation that we only have once a year? Every year we get all fired up and then the rest of the year nobody says anything…. So I’m not going to boycott, but I’m going to continue to bitch as I have all year round because I’m tired of seeing movies where no one is represented except a bit of the population, not all of it,’ – Whoopi Goldberg

‘If you think back 10 years ago, the Academy was doing a better job. Think about how many more African Americans were nominated…. And all of a sudden, you feel like we’re moving in the wrong direction’ – George Clooney

‘Our boys are being shot left and right. People are starving. People are trying to pay bills. And you’re talking about some f*****g actors and Oscars. It just ain’t that deep’ – Janet Hubert

‘When Jada comes out as Gay and her beard husband admits his first marriage ended when she walked in to him **** servicing his Sugar Daddy Benny Medina ..then I will listen to them’ – Alexis Arquette


Speaking out: William H. Macy, Will Smith, Danny Boyle and Lupita Nyong’o

‘Yo, Chris. Come check me out at #TheOscars this year. They got me parking cars on G level’ – Don Cheadle

‘It can’t be about box office, because I think black actors and stories along those lines have done very, very well, obviously’ – Steve McQueen

‘I think that diversity is the American superpower. That’s why we’re great. So many different people from so many different places adding their ideas, their inspirations, their influences to this beautiful American gumbo. … so when I look at the series of nominations of the Academy, it is not reflecting that beauty’ – Will Smith

‘It’s anti-white racism. Maybe black actors don’t deserve to be on the final stretch?’ – Charlotte Rampling

‘I do support the Oscar Ban movement’s position that the nominations do not reflect the diversity of our community. The Oscar Ban movement reflects a larger discussion about racism in the criminal justice system. I hope the Oscar Ban movement opens the way for my peers to open their hearts to the #BlackLivesMatter movement as well’ – Mark Ruffalo

‘I think everybody acknowledges that everything evolves and changes. It is going to evolve and change more, you can see that coming’ – Danny Boyle
‘There’s loads of black actors. In the end you can’t vote for an actor because he’s black. You can’t say ‘I’m going to vote for him, he’s not very good, but he’s black, I’ll vote for him’ – Sir Michael Caine

Unconvinced: Sir Michael Caine, producer Gerald Molen and Academy Award nominee Charlotte Rampling have questioned plans for an Oscar boycott while Reese Witherspoon called for a change to Academy voting membership

‘As an Academy member, I would love to see a more diverse voting membership’ – Reese Witherspoon

‘The idea of a boycott is ridiculous. Are their noses bent out of shape by the award nominations? Of course. That is normal in a town of egos and red carpet desires. While there were many performances of note, not all my choices for ‘best’ in the various categories have been realized.’I say to all my co-members: ‘stop acting like spoiled brats. Look to the next awards show for recognition – if you deserve it’ – Schindler’s List producer Gerald Molen

‘I think in our industry and our business, it’s really about looking to who’s telling what story, who’s being allowed to direct, who’s being allowed to act in it, and I think that needs to change’ – John Kransinski

‘The problem is not with the Oscars, the problem is with the Hollywood movie-making system’ – Viola Davis

Nyong’o did not however say she would be boycotting the awards, but did write; ‘I stand with my peers who are calling for change in expanding the stories that are told and the recognition of the people who tell them’.

British actor Idris Elba – who didn’t receive a nomination for his role in Beasts of No Nation – addressed the issue in a speech to politicians in London on Monday.

‘We need to counter what everybody has, see the lay of the land and see who has which careers in TV—who makes TV, and who is allowed on TV and when they get the opportunity which roles do they play, on and off screen,’ he said.

‘You have to ask the question: are black people normally playing petty criminals? Are women always the love interest or talking about men? Are gay people always stereotyped? Are disabled people ever seen at all?’

Viola Davis agreed it is a wider issue than the Oscars alone.

‘The problem is not with the Oscars, the problem is with the Hollywood movie-making system,’ the two-time Oscar nominee told Entertainment Tonight.

Actor John Kransinski added a similar complaint.

‘My feelings are beyond the Oscars. Though I think it’s a shame, I don’t know that they should be taking all the responsibility.

‘I think in our industry and our business, it’s really about looking to who’s telling what story, who’s being allowed to direct, who’s being allowed to act in it, and I think that needs to change.”

It’s not just actors who have weighed in. Schindler’s List producer and voting member of the Academy, Gerald Molen, has branded the diversity critics, ‘spoiled brats’.

‘There is no racism except for those who create an issue. That is the worst kind. Using such an ugly way of complaining,’ Molen told The Hollywood Reporter on Thursday

‘The idea of a boycott is ridiculous. Are their noses bent out of shape by the award nominations? Of course. That is normal in a town of egos and red carpet desires. While there were many performances of note, not all my choices for ‘best’ in the various categories have been realized.

‘I say to all my co-members: ‘stop acting like spoiled brats. Look to the next awards show for recognition – if you deserve it’.’

‘The only comment that might have some legitimate substance is the one from Jada Pinkett. I understand her disappointment for her husband, but that doesn’t mean she is correct in her analysis.

‘As far as Michael Moore is concerned, he is a socialist always looking to insert his brand of racist hatred. Spike Lee — haven’t I heard this from him before?’
‘In a liberal town like Hollywood, [saying voters are racist] makes about as much sense as saying all members of the Academy vote Republican.’

He’s got one too: Jonathan Demme won Best Director at the Academy Awards in 1992 for the blockbuster hit The Silence Of The Lambs. He wrote Saturday that the Academy should make changes right now and not wait

In an exclusive interview with Dailymail.com, Up in the Air casting agent Lori Wyman defended the Academy and the nominees selected for this year’s awards.

She said she believes Academy members ‘picked the best actors’ in the end and that she did not believe ‘people were omitted from the Oscars for their ethnicity.’

She also said that when she is casting she is always ‘colorblind’ and just looking for the best actor.

Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs said in a statement on Monday that changes were coming which would hopefully result in a more diverse group of nominees, and Academy members, in the years to come.

Isaacs, who in addition to being president of the Academy is also one of the invite-only group’s few non-white members, said in a statement on Monday; ‘I’d like to acknowledge the wonderful work of this year’s nominees.

‘While we celebrate their extraordinary achievements, I am both heartbroken and frustrated about the lack of inclusion. This is a difficult but important conversation, and it’s time for big changes.

‘The Academy is taking dramatic steps to alter the makeup of our membership.

‘In the coming days and weeks we will conduct a review of our membership recruitment in order to bring about much-needed diversity in our 2016 class and beyond.’

She then added; ‘As many of you know we have implemented changes to diversify our membership in the last four years.

‘But the change is not coming as fast as we would like. We need to do more, and better and more quickly.’

93% WHITE, 76% MALE AGED 62: MEET THE AVERAGE OSCARS VOTER


A full listing of The Academy’s membership and their demographics are not publicly released but previous studies and reports have revealed more about the group’s make-up

In 2012, the LA Times found there were 5, 765 voting members, 94% of whom were Caucasian and 77% male

Only 2% at that time were black and less than 2% were Latino

The newspaper found the group had a median age of 62

In 2013 they found 93% white and 76% male and the average age inched up to 63

Membership is now believed to have risen over 6,000 but ethic minority breakdown of members in unavailable and not every member has to vote

The Economist found no actors from ethnic minorities were nominated in 1995 and 1997 or any year between 1975 and 1980.


Top secret: Information on the membership of the Academy is hard to come by

95% of nominations in total have gone to white actors

Each award is broken up into 17 branches i.e. the acting branch and the directing branch

Academy members qualified in each respective area vote on the nominees for awards in that area i.e. actors vote for the acting nominees, directors vote for the director nominees.

One exception is that all voting members can vote on their top 10 best picture nominees and Animated Feature Film and Foreign Language Film are voted on by special screening panels

Nomination ballots are sent out in December and returned in January

The acting areas are voted for by the largest number of people

Once the nominee lists are drawn up, members get to vote once for every award

They are discouraged from voting if they haven’t seen the work or feel ill-prepared to make a judgement but are not barred

Final ballots are mailed out at the end of January and need to be filled in and returned by a week before the ceremony.

Three members are appointed as governors of their relative branches. Notable governors include Annette Bening and Tom Hanks in the actors branch; former Sony chief Amy Pascal in the executive branch and Zero Dark Thirty director Kathryn Bigelow is in the directors branch

The Academy on Friday announced new rules to try and enhance diversity

They have vowed to double minority and female members by 2020

Academy president Cheryl Boone Isaacs said: ‘The Academy is going to lead and not wait for the industry to catch up’.

Other changes include limiting members’ voting status to a period of 10 years, to be extended only if the individual remains active in film during that decade.

Lifetime voting rights will be granted only to Academy Award nominees and winners, and to members after three ten-year voting terms.

Previously, all active members received lifetime voting rights

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