Jan 7, 2015

Real Racism: Research Finds Cops More Willing to Shoot Whites than Blacks

via American Renaissance

It’s widely assumed that white police officers are more likely to shoot black suspects as a result of racial bias, but recent research suggests the opposite is true.

An innovative study published in the Journal of Experimental Criminology found that participants in realistic simulations felt more threatened by black suspects yet took longer to pull the trigger on black men than on white or Hispanic men.

“This behavioral ‘counter-bias’ might be rooted in people’s concerns about the social and legal consequences of shooting a member of a historically oppressed racial or ethnic group,” said the paper, which went practically unnoticed when it was published online on May 22, but took on new significance in the wake of a series of high-profile police-involved shootings involving black victims over the summer.

The results back up what one of the researchers, University of Missouri-St. Louis professor David Klinger, has found after independently interviewing more than 300 police officers: While they don’t want to shoot anybody, they really don’t want to shoot black suspects.

“Across these 300 interviews, I have multiple officers telling me that they didn’t shoot only because the suspect was black or the suspect was a woman, or something that would not be consistent with this narrative of cops out there running and gunning,” said Mr. Klinger, a former cop and author of “Into the Kill Zone: A Cop’s Eye View of Deadly Force” (2006).

“When it comes to the issue of race, I’ve never had a single officer tell me, ‘I didn’t shoot a guy because he was white.’ I’ve had multiple officers tell me, ‘I didn’t shoot a guy because he was black,’ ” Mr. Klinger said. “And this is 10, even 20 years ago. Officers are alert to the fact that if they shoot a black individual, the odds of social outcry are far greater than if they shoot a white individual.”

In fact, he said, officers involved in shootings have told him that they were actually relieved that the person they shot was white, not black.

{snip}

The interviews, which he conducted for a book he’s planning to finish this year, run directly counter to the prevailing view pushed by social justice groups, politicians and others: that shooting victims such as 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson were victims at least in part of racial discrimination against blacks among cops.

{snip}

The study found that the 48 participants waited longest before firing on black suspects in “shoot” scenarios, even though the participants exhibited “stronger threat responses” when facing black suspects than with white or Hispanic suspects.
Eighty-five percent of the participants were white, and none was a police officer. At the same time, a 2013 study led by Ms. James using active police, military and the general public found the same phenomenon: All three groups took longer to shoot black suspects, and participants were also more likely to fire on unarmed whites and Hispanics than blacks.

{snip}

So why are blacks shot more often by police? While the FBI’s national database has been widely criticized as incomplete, data compiled by Mr. Klinger in St. Louis over the past decade shows that 90 percent of police shootings involve blacks, even though they only make up 49 percent of the city’s population.

At the same time, he said, that figure is commensurate with the percentage of blacks involved in violent crime. Roughly 90 percent of those killed each year in St. Louis are black, and 90 percent of them are shot by other blacks, he said.

What’s more, he said, black SWAT officers make up about one-third of the St. Louis force–and they commit on average about one-third of the shootings each year.

“And this is consistent with every other study that’s ever been done,” said Mr. Klinger, who, as a rookie officer in Los Angeles, fatally shot a black man armed with a knife who had stabbed his partner, Dennis Azevedo, in the chest.

The Estranged, the Sacred

via Majority Rights

Accolade by Edmund Leighton
I am not exactly sure how these things go together, or how the estranged might be helped, but rather I am thinking out loud here, liable to tweak these brief paragraphs around some, hoping and welcoming people to think about this with me and GW (though unfortunately, not yet expecting to get any audience to move beyond the transmission model, to a participatory model of knowledge acquisition). Anyway.

GW says:
Interesting that Richard Williamson calls subjectivism what you call objectivism. Pretty much.  Of course, his focus is his own and not yours - he is seeing an atomising, individualising tendency where you see a focus on the object that excludes the self.  Put these together and out pops the self-estranging, individualising relationship of “false Dasein” to the external world we are, as evolving organisms, bound to process.
Something more could be said about that, including the fact that Heidegger’s false Dasien is, of course, a state of witness in Time and Place rather than in Truth (ie, a bit like being socially constructed, but only a bit). So it will operate within negative qualitative parameters, ie, more badly, or maladaptively, at some times than others, and never at the optimum.  Modernism, then, is a grand historical process of turning to the bad.  For you, postmodernism is the process of turning away from the worst of that and towards a more vivifying collective life, while for Williamson sedevacantism and Catholic traditionalism constitute the process of rejecting modernist Rome’s false witness to God and accepting His true church.
There the similarity ends, because you believe that reason, as a trait of the mind, has its place in a true European life, while Williamson insists that only faith and God’s grace can give eternal life.  You are right. Here is Williamson’s original missive”: http://stmarcelinitiative.com/email/en-eleison-comments-by-mgr-williamson-issue-cccxc-390.html
Fraser complains similarly against rationalism.

Though he correctly seeks to organize and coordinate “W.A.S.P.” diaspora through a shared rubric (as I propose we do through the DNA Nation) he proposes to do so through reviving the Anglican Church: http://www.radixjournal.com/journal/2015/1/5/the-dispossessed-elite

I believe that we are inclined to believe rather, and it seems MacDonald as well, that there is no putting the toothpaste back in that tube.

However, while DNA is not exactly thin gruel, it could use the vivification of which you speak and the vision of perfection which you and as Santayana note, orientation toward perfection, a girding and bounding like rocks against which the waves of chance crash.

This is what has me thinking of the sacred, how it has been trampled by the scientism/liberalism continuum, linearity of modernity, reckless experimentalism in pursuit of endless progress. How by contrast the sacred can ensconce those patterns safely which are beyond empirical purview or too precious for the efficiency of empirical, scientific testing.

Again, the postmodern turn sees the wreckage of modernity and allows for the reconstruction of traditional practices ...and the sacral rite, the episode…all of course revisable and modified by new understandings..we can take the best of both traditional reconstruction and modernist pursuit of innovation…. but we CAN take the best of tradition and sacral rite. ..and history….we are not duty bound by a pledge to be original ex nihilo and to endlessly pursue novelty and new invention, transformation without pause and elaboration.

The sacred..going back to the wisdom of the language that Heidegger and Vico valued.. sa – cred..  ..cred.. crede…sounds like something to go by..something in fact, cyclical, involving time and cycles, which if properly observed correspond with credibility.. the ability to establish historical continuity, coherence in protracted warrant… in a way that empirical myopia, focused on arbitrary presentation of the happenstance episode of circumstances does not afford. ..by contrast, the sacral episode re enacted does begin to build that social capital and with that the sacredness of the realm -sac-re-ment (kingdom minding).. sacral episode of re-ligion (reconnecting the realm, the kingdom).

Looking through Vico, one can see him talking about people beginning in religion; and in the etymological sense of religion you can see that having truth, as you know, religion - re -ligion, a re attachment to practices, to a realm of people, particularly featured in the sacred episode, which ensconces the essence (as opposed to the arbitrary) presented by the cycles of time, reconstructing, reconnecting, re, the king (Ital), the relatives, the realm.

Perhaps the sacral episode facilitates culture, the cultivated turn, turning back to the systemic essence and homeostasis of peoplehood.

Sacrament takes evaluation into a pattern of trust, beyond the episode and moment, beyond the life span and relationship even, connecting to the time immemorial pattern.

I have argued elsewhere this does not preclude treating sex in other ways, celebrative or whatever, but the culture must establish this choice for people, very seriously - sex as sacrament, including an option for a single partner for life - even for however small a number who might opt for it, if the culture, the people, are to have agency and authenticity.

It would apparently corresponds with marriage rights for many.

Vico observes the sacral, civilizing episodes of birth, marriage and death.

Sex as sacrament is not evaluated within the episode or moment, as it might be with those merely attempting to assess, irrespective of patterns, biographical details, and relationship, what is best in a given moment; rather sex is sexy; in tension between dominance and submission (sexy, provided that is not taken too seriously), also a tension between human dignity and animal drive – this is why the nerdy White lady, a bit older, with a few wrinkles, can be more sexy than the tattooed dancer. Sex as sacrament is not limited to an episode, as it would be for those who would like to celebrate a variety of partners. By definition, it would move beyond autobiography, as the sacral entails a time-line not so delimited and unrepeatable as are the concerns of the life-span. Sacrament does, however, take note of family relations, the eroticism of the nobility of one’s partner’s family. Moreover, and ultimately, however, it takes into account and connects with the Europen Cultural pattern, its history and future.

Paedophiles in High Places

via BNP News

It doesn’t get much more corrupt than the political Establishment today in Britain, and with horrific revelations of paedophilia rife among the ruling political elite in Westminster it is cause for grave concern for the British public.

As the leader of the only genuinely anti-Establishment political party in Britain, BNP Chairman Adam Walker discusses the challenges of being ruled by such a corrupt authority. 

The BNP is leading the way to Protect Children from the betrayal of the rotten Establishment in Britain.

Shopping Stampede Video Shows the Effects of White GeNOcide

via White GeNOcide Project

A video captured at a budget-clothing store in Dewsbury England, is causing uproar after it was covertly recorded and the images uploaded to the Internet. A secret camera was set up to capture the flood of people entering the store for a Boxing Day sale, but the shoppers recorded in the video say they are offended, apparently it was filmed without their consent. The thing is though, literally EVERY LAST PERSON entering this store is non-White, most are of Pakistani origin (note, the British press like to call these people Muslim to shift the focus off their racial identity).

This video really is an insight into the effects of White genocide. Online statistics for Dewsbury are sketchy at best, with sources quoting the majority population as being BORN in England, a mealy-mouthed way to avoid stating the White English numbers.

So what are the White English demographics in this once all White mining town located in the beautiful West Yorkshire area? A link from the BBC might give us an idea. Discussing a school in Dewsbury it says:

“At Eastborough School 15 years ago 5% of the children were of Asian origin. Now there are 67%, and the younger classes have considerably more, one class being 100% Asian”

Can you imagine the uproar if a class in a Tibetan school was 100% Chinese? Who could imagine such a thing in 2015?! Here’s the kicker though, that quote is from an article written back in 1986! Seems like Dewsbury was very much ahead of the trend in terms of White Genocide and now we are seeing the full effects of it in 2015! People should have listened to opponents of White genocide back in 1986 instead of calling them smear names. But I suppose the anti-White establishment was using their usual lies back then, presumably saying things won’t change the racial make up of England and that “diversity” is a positive change because of all the new restaurants to eat at.

Remember, when they say that an area needs more diversity what they really mean is no more White people. The diversity sociopaths won’t be happy until they have literally chased down the last White person in the last White area and made it “diverse”.

Let’s face facts; “diversity” is just a code word for White genocide.

HITLER'S TABLE TALK Study Hour, Episode 40

via Carolyn Yeager

Listen Now

Germany's Peoples' Court in session
Ray Goodwin and Carolyn Yeager read and comment on the June 5-8, 1942 lunch and dinner table monologues by the German Leader, as taken down in shorthand by aide Henry Picker. Included in this episode:
  • The negative effect of studying the Jewish Old Testament - Hitler wants to help Germans avoid religious mania;
  • Hitler disapproves of giving military titles to saints of the Church, as is done in Spain;
  • The Catholic Church strives for power and cannot recognize any organization other than its own;
  • Hungarian Regent Horthy makes some requests through his Prime Minister Kallay;
  • Hitler speaks brilliantly and at some length on treason and why it requires severe punishment;
  • Hitler now considers his failure to create a Bishop of the Reich a stroke of luck, considering what is happening in Spain;
  • The education of the youth, teacher training, and the press.
The edition of Hitler's Table Talk being used was translated by Norman Cameron and R.H. Stevens, published by Enigma Books, New York, and can be found as a pdf here.

Waiting for the Sunrise

via The Archdruid Report

By the time many of my readers get to this week’s essay here on The Archdruid Report, it will be Christmas Day. Here in America, that means that we’re finally most of the way through one of the year’s gaudiest orgies of pure vulgar greed, the holiday shopping season, which strikes me as rather an odd way to celebrate the birth of someone whose teachings so resolutely critiqued the mindless pursuit of material goodies. If, as that same person pointed out, it’s impossible to serve both God and Mammon, the demon of wealth, it’s pretty clear which of those two personages most Americans—including no small number who claim to be Christians—really consider the reason for the season.
A long time before that stable in Bethlehem received its most famous tenants, though, the same day was being celebrated across much of the northern temperate zone. The reason has to do with one of those details everyone knew before the invention of electric lighting and few people remember now, the movement of the apparent point of sunrise along the eastern horizon during the year. Before the printing press made calendars ubiquitous, that was a standard way of gauging the changing seasons: the point of sunrise swings from southeast to northeast as winter in the northern hemisphere gives way to summer and from northeast back to southeast as summer gives way again to winter, and if you have a way to track the apparent motion, you can follow the yearly cycle with a fair degree of precision.
This movement is like the swing of a pendulum: it’s very fast in the middle of the arc, and slows to a dead stop on either end. That makes the spring and fall equinoxes easy to identify—if you have a couple of megaliths lined up just right, for example, the shadow of one will fall right on the foot of the other on the days of the equinoxes, and a little to one side or the other one day before or after—but the summer and winter solstices are a different matter. At those times of year, the sun seems to grind to a halt around the 17th of June or December, you wait for about a week, and then finally the sun comes up a little further south on June 25th or a little further north on December 25th, and you know for a fact that the wheel of the seasons is still turning.
That’s why Christmas is when it is. I’ve read, though I don’t have the reference handy, that shepherds in the Levant back in the day kept watch over their flocks in the fields in late summer, not in December, and so—if the New Testament narrative is to be believed—Jesus was something like four months old when the first Christmas rolled around. As far as I know, nobody knows exactly how the present date got put in place, but I suspect the old solar symbolism had a lot to do with it; in those days, the Christian church was less prone to the rigid literalism that’s become common in recent centuries, and also quite aware of seasonal and astronomical cycles—consider the complicated rules for setting the date of Easter, in which movements of the sun and moon both play a part.
I’ve been thinking quite a bit about such things as the holiday shopping season stumbles toward its end and a troubled, weary, and distracted nation prepares to bid a hearty good riddance to 2014. Of course Druids generally think about such things; the seasonal cycle has had an important role in our traditions since those were revived in the eighteenth century. Even so, it’s been more on my mind than usual.  In particular, as I think about the shape of things in the world right now, what keeps coming to mind is the image of the old loremasters, waiting in the darkness at the end of a cold winter’s night to see the sunrise begin swinging back in the direction of spring.
Those of my readers who see such an image as hopelessly out of place just now have, I grant, quite a bit of evidence on their side. Most notably, the coming of 2015 marks a full decade since production of conventional petroleum worldwide hit its all-time peak and began to decline. Those who were around in the early days of the peak oil scene, as I was, will doubtless recall how often and eagerly the more optimistic members of that scene insisted that once the peak arrived, political and business interests everywhere would be forced to come to terms with the end of the age of cheap abundant energy. Once that harsh but necessary awakening took place, they argued, the transition to sustainable societies capable of living within the Earth’s annual budget of sunlight would finally get under way.
Of course that’s not what happened.  Instead, political and business interests responded to the peak by redefining what counts as crude oil, pouring just about any flammable liquid they could find into the world’s fuel tank—ethanol, vegetable oil, natural gas liquids, “dilbit” (diluted bitumen) from tar sands, you name it—while scraping the bottom of the barrel for petroleum via hydrofracturing, ultradeep offshore wells, and other extreme extraction methods. All of those require much higher inputs of fossil fuel energy per barrel produced than conventional crude does, so that a growing fraction of the world’s fossil fuel supply has had to be burned just to produce more fossil fuel. Did any whisper of this far from minor difficulty find its way into the cheery charts of “all liquids” and the extravagantly rose-colored projections of future production? Did, for example, any of the official agencies tasked with tracking fossil fuel production consider subtracting an estimate for barrels of oil equivalent used in extraction from the production figures, so that we would have at least a rough idea of the world’s net petroleum production?  Surely you jest.
The need to redirect an appreciable fraction of the world’s fossil fuel supply into fossil fuel production, in turn, had significant economic costs. Those were shown by the simultaneous presence of prolonged economic dysfunction and sky-high oil prices: a combination, please note, that last appeared during the energy crises of the 1970s, and should have served as a warning sign that something similar was afoot. Instead of paying attention, political and business interests around the world treated the abrupt fraying of the economy as a puzzling anomaly to be drowned in a vat of cheap credit—when, that is, they didn’t treat it as a public relations problem that could be solved by proclaiming a recovery that didn’t happen to exist. Economic imbalances accordingly spun out of control; paper wealth flowed away from those who actually produce goods and service into the hands of those who manipulate fiscal abstractions; the global economy was whipsawed by convulsive fiscal crisis in 2009 and 2009, and shows every sign of plunging into a comparable round of turmoil right now.
I wish I could say that the alternative energy side of the equation had responded to any of this in a way that might point toward a better future, but no such luck. With embarrassingly few exceptions, the things that got funding, or even any significant amount of discussion, were the sorts of overpriced white-elephant systems that only make economic sense in the presence of lavish government subsidies, and are utterly dependent on a technostructure that’s only viable given exactly the sort of cheap abundant fossil fuels that those systems are theoretically going to replace. Grid-tied photovoltaic systems, gargantuan wind turbines, and vast centralized solar-thermal facilities soaked up the attention and the funding, while simple, affordable, thoroughly proven technologies such as solar water heating got another decade of malign neglect. As for using less—the necessary foundation for anything approaching a sustainable future—that remained utterly taboo in polite company.
Back in 2005, a then-famous study done for the Department of Energy by a team headed by Robert Hirsch showed that to get through declining oil supplies without massive crisis, preparations for the descent would have to begin twenty years before the peak arrived. Since the peak of conventional crude oil production had already arrived in 2005, this warning was perhaps a little tardy, but a crash program focusing on conservation and the conversion of energy-intensive infrastructure to less vulnerable technologies might still have done much. Instead, we collectively wasted another decade on daydreams—and all the while, week after dreary week, the mainstream media has kept up a steady drumbeat of articles claiming to prove that this or that or the other thing has disproved peak oil. Given all this, is there any reason to expect anything other than a continuation of the same dysfunctional behavior, with the blind leading the blind until they all tumble together down the long bitter slope ahead?
As it happens, I think there is.
Part of it, oddly enough, is the steady drumbeat of articles just referred to, each claiming to have disproved peak oil once and for all. The last time the subject was shouted down, in the early 1980s, there wasn’t that kind of ongoing barrage; after a few blandly confident denunciations, the subject just got dropped from the media so hard it would have left a dent on a battleship’s armored deck, and was consigned thereafter to a memory hole straight out of George Orwell. Presumably that was the intention this time, too, but something has shifted.  In the early 1980s, when the media started spouting the same sort of cornucopian drivel they’re engaged in this time, the vast majority of the people who claimed to be concerned about energy and the environment trotted along after them with scarcely a dissenting bleat. That hasn’t happened in the present case; if I may indulge in a bit of very edgy irony here, this is one of the very few ways in which it really is different this time.
It’s worth glancing back over how that difference unfolded. To be sure, the brief heyday during which media reports took the end of the age of cheap abundant energy seriously stopped abruptly when puffing up the fracking bubble became the order of the day; the aforementioned drumbeat of alleged disproofs got going; those of us who kept on talking about peak oil started getting pressure from mainstream (that is, corporate-funded) environmentalists to drop the subject, get on board with the climate change bandwagon, and join them in the self-defeating rut that’s kept the environmental movement from accomplishing anything worthwhile for the last thirty years. In response, a certain number of bloggers and speakers who had been involved in peak oil discussions did in fact drop the subject, and those peak oil organizations that had committed themselves to a grant-funded organizational model fell on hard times. A fair number of us stayed the course, though.  Far more significantly, so did a very substantial portion of our audience.
That latter point is the thing that I find most encouraging. Over the last decade, in the teeth of constant propaganda from the mass media and a giddy assortment of other sources, the number of people in the United States and elsewhere who are aware of the ongoing decline of industrial society, who recognize the impossibility of infinite growth on a finite planet, and who are willing to make changes in their own lives in response to these things, somehow failed to dwindle away to near-irrelevance, as it did the last time around. If anything—though I don’t have hard statistics to back this perception, just a scattering of suggestive proxy measurements—that number seems to have increased.
When I speak to audiences about catabolic collapse and the twilight of the industrial age these days, for example, I don’t get anything like as many blank looks or causal dismissals as those concepts routinely fielded even a few years ago. Books on peak oil and related topics, mine among them, remain steady sellers, and stats on this blog have zigzagged unevenly but relentlessly upwards over the years, regularly topping 300,000 page views a month this autumn. Less quantifiable but more telling, at least to me, are the shifts I’ve watched in people I know. Some who used to reject the whole idea of imminent and ongoing decline with scornful laughter have slowly come around to rueful admissions that, well, maybe we really are in trouble; others, starting from the same place, now denounce any such notion with the sort of brittle rage that you normally see in people who are losing the ability to make themselves keep believing the dogma they’ve committed themselves to defending.
Even more telling are the young people I meet who have sized up the future with cold eyes, and walked away from the officially approved options spread before them like so many snares by a society whose easy promises a great many of them no longer believe.  Each year that passes brings me more encounters with people in their late teens and twenties who have recognized that the rules that shaped their parents’ and grandparents’ lives don’t work any more, that most of the jobs they have been promised either don’t exist or won’t exist for much longer, that a college education these days is a one-way ticket to decades of debt peonage, and that most of the other  institutions that claim to be there to help them don’t have their best interests in mind.  They’re picking up crafts and skilled trades, living with their parents or with groups of other young people, and learning to get by on less, because the price of doing otherwise is more than they’re willing to pay.
More broadly, more and more people seem to be turning their backs on the American dream, or more precisely on the bleak waking nightmare into which the American dream has metastasized over the last few decades. A growing number of people have walked away from the job market and found ways to support themselves outside a mainstream economy that’s increasingly stacked against them. Even among those who are still in the belly of the beast, the sort of unthinking trust in business as usual that used to be tolerably common straight through American society is increasingly rare these days. Outside the narrowing circle of those who benefit from the existing order of society, a crisis of legitimacy is in the making, and it’s not simply the current US political system that’s facing the brunt of that crisis—it’s the entire crumbling edifice of American collective life.
That crisis of legitimacy won’t necessarily lead to better things. It could all too easily head in directions no sane person would wish to go. I’ve written here more than once about the possibility that the abject and ongoing failure of constructive leadership in contemporary America could lay the groundwork for the rise of something closely akin to the fascist regimes of Depression-era Europe, as people desperate for an alternative to the Republicratic consensus frozen into place inside the Washington DC beltway turn to a charismatic demagogue who promises to break the gridlock and bring change. Things could also go in even more destructive directions; a nation that ships tens of thousands of its young people in uniform to an assortment of Middle Eastern countries, teaches them all the latest trends in  counterinsurgency warfare, and then dumps them back home in a collapsing economy without the benefits they were promised, has only itself to blame if some of them end up applying their skills in the service of a domestic insurgency against the present US government.
Those possibilities are real, and so are a galaxy of other potential outcomes that are considerably worse than what exists in America today. That said, constructive change is also a possibility. The absurd extravagances that most Americans still think of as an ordinary standard of living were always destined to be a short-term phenomenon, and we’re decades past the point at which a descent from those giddy heights could have been made without massive disruptions; no possible combination of political, social, economic, and environmental transformations at this point can change those unwelcome facts. Even so, there’s much worth doing that can still be done. We can at least stop making things worse than they have to be; we can begin shifting, individually and collectively, to technologies and social forms that will still make sense in a world of tightly constrained energy and resource supplies; we can preserve things of value to the near, middle, and far future that might otherwise be lost; we might, given luck and hard work, be able to revive enough of the moribund traditions of American democracy and voluntary association to provide an alternative down the road to the naked rule of force and fraud.
None of that will be easy, but then all the easy options went whistling down the wind a long time ago. No doubt there will still be voices insisting that Americans can have the lifestyles to which they think they’re entitled if only this, or that, or the other thing were to happen; no doubt the collapse of the fracking bubble will be followed by some equally gaudy and dishonest set of cargo-cult rhetoric meant to convince the rubes that happy days will shortly be here again, just as soon as billions of dollars we don’t happen to have are poured down whatever the next rathole du jour happens to be. If enough of us ignore those claims and do what must be done—and “enough” in this context does not need to equal a majority, or even a large minority, of Americans—there’s still much of value that can be accomplished in the time before us.
To return to the metaphor that opened this post, that first slight shift of sunrise north along the horizon from the solstice point, faint as it is, is a reminder that winter doesn’t last forever, even though the coldest nights and the worst of the winter storms come after that point is past. In the same way, bleak as the immediate prospects may be, there can still be a future worth having on the far side of the crisis of our age, and our actions here and now can further the immense task of bringing such a future into being. In the new year, as I continue the current series of posts on the American future, I plan on talking at quite some length about some of the things that can be done and some of the possibilities that those actions might bring within reach.
And with that, I would like to wish my Christian readers a very merry Christmas, my readers of other faiths, a blessed holiday season, and to all my readers, a happy New Year.

John Wayne -- A REAL American to Look up to

via Nationalist Sentinel

Being an avid fan of Westerns I watched an interview with John Wayne this morning. It was taken just after he finished what I think was his best film - THE SHOOTIST
 

John Wayne and I also share the same surname. he was born Marion Michael Morrison.

He died three years after the making of the film of cancer at the age of 72 and of cancer - which was the subject of "The Shootist" an old gunslinger coming home to die.


After the talk about the film, the sickly liberal interviewer tried to trap John Wayne into a rightist, hopefully racialist comment. Wayne didn't back down & even referred to the interviewer as a ' bleeding heart liberal who was guilty about all them folk who hyphenated their name' (Afro-American etc).


Obama is the first hyphenated President!

Here' some other quotes that let us into the heart of "The Duke."

“I'd like to know why well-educated idiots keep apologizing for lazy and complaining people who think the world owes them a living.”

“I don't feel we did wrong in taking this great country away from them. There were great numbers of people who needed new land, and the Indians were selfishly trying to keep it for themselves.” 

“Government has no wealth, and when a politician promises to give you something for nothing, he must first confiscate that wealth from you -- either by direct taxes, or by the cruelly indirect tax of inflation.”

“The hyphenated American is ridiculous. But that’s what we have to put up with. I think that any person that’s in the United States is better off here than they would be where they came from.”

“I would think somebody like Jane Fonda and her idiot husband would be terribly ashamed and saddened that they were a part of causing us to stop helping the South Vietnamese. Now look what’s happening. They’re getting killed by the millions. Murdered by the millions. How the hell can she and her husband sleep at night?”

 For more information on John Wayne's political view visit the website - John Wayne

The Green Flag of Islam Over Athens – At the Spot where Kaminis Summoned the Riot Police to Prevent Golden Dawn from Distributing Food

via Golden Dawn, New York

This moment thousands of Muslims have flooded Athens. Muslims of every age hold Green Flags in hand and shout slogans while making their way to the center and to the surrounding streets.

For Muslims, today is Mawlid al-Nabi, a holiday celebrated by some Muslims which commemorates the birth of the Prophet Muhammad.

It takes place on the 12th day of the Islamic month of Rabi al-Awwa. The celebration begins the evening of January 2nd and continues until the evening of January 3rd. They continue until dawn of the next day, and for them it is a day of triumph, joy and immense importance.

Using a loudspeaker . . . they shouted slogans in favor of their prophet and called on all the Muslims in Athens to follow them . . .

Eastern Mysticism Meets Pathological White Altruism: Brunch, Yoga, and the Hilarity of SWPLs

via Stuff Black People Don't Like

Dumbed-down White liberal opens yoga studio in 70% black Ferguson to "bring peace and balance" -- will she accept EBT?
Yoga offers only one positive: hot girls in yoga pants.. 

Nothing more, nothing less. 

An overlooked story from the Farce in Ferguson needs rehashing today, if only to remind people why scores of black people disrupting white people enjoying brunch in New York City is a cause for laughter instead of anger.

Restaurants with outdoor seating (where brunch can be pleasantly consumed) is an immediate indicator you are in a tony, majority white area, where the social capital collectively created by individual whites enables the type of status whoring completely absent in a majority black area. 

The introduction of blacks into a community they had no part in building represents the tinder in ensuring all social capital is quickly consumed by the immediate regression to the black mean. 

Which is why the story of Angie Carron must be told. [Yoga Instructor Hopes To Bring Healing To Ferguson With New Studio, Riverfront Times, 11-13-14]:
As anticipation in Ferguson mounts, maybe the town could use a little yoga.Angie Carron wants to be the one to bring it there. 
The fifteen-year Florissant resident and owner of OM Turtle Yoga recently signed a lease for a second studio, an 1,100-square-foot space down the road from the Ferguson police station. 
"Everyone is like, 'Why Ferguson? Why now?'" Carron says. "But truly, why not Ferguson right now? We all need to find our center, our peace, our balance, and I think this is a better time than any to bring our studio to Ferguson." 
But it's not unreasonable to think opening a storefront in Ferguson is a risk. 
Protesters have threatened other nearby businesses, and more demonstrations are likely if Darren Wilson, the Ferguson police officer who fatally shot eighteen-year-old Michael Brown, is not charged with a crime. 
Andy Wurm's Tire and Wheel, directly across from Ferguson's police headquarters, offers one example. Although the majority of protesters cooperated a couple months ago when Wurm asked them to move off his lot, he says he received some threats of bricks going through his windows. 
Faraci Pizza, a few blocks from the police station on South Florissant Avenue, has also been a target. Protesters who claimed to see the owner point a gun at them threatened to shut the restaurant down. The family that owns Faraci said they've lost a lot of business since August because people are afraid to come into Ferguson at night. 
All the more reason to open a yoga studio, Carron says. 
When she signed the lease for the Ferguson space, the former Express Scripts employee walked away from a six-figure salary, benefits and a 401K, deciding to focus her energy on operating the two studios full time. 
"It truly is a mission," she says of her passion to help her students in the same way yoga has helped her. "I am blessed to work with all these people on a daily basis, and I want to bring that to Ferguson." 
Before she decided to open a second studio, Carron's morning commute to Express Scripts took her down South Florissant Avenue past protesters and signs and boarded-up windows. 
"There's a lot of passionate people in that town that want to see it grow," she says. "It just feels like yoga would be a good fit for helping the town rebuild." 
She plans to open her second yoga studio location in early December.
"There's a lot of passionate people in that town that want to see it grow..."

You mean like Michael Brown's stepfather Louis Head who shouted, "Burn this motherf---er down" and "Burn this bitch down"? [Michael Brown's stepfather at rally: 'Burn this bitch down!', CNN.com, 12-8-14]

He seems ardent in his steadfast belief in growing Ferguson, so it's axiomatic he was one of the first to sign up for a yoga lesson with Angie Carron's OM Turtle Yoga, right?

Were those black people who engaged in the #BlackBrunchNYC protest against white supremacy (never mind the white people eating brunch probably voted for both Barack Obama and Bill de Blasio) to see their movement spread, OM Turtle Yoga would be the perfect venue to voice concern with white supremacy and white racism in Ferguson.

Only a white racist would believe they alone could bring peace and balance to an unstable community, such as the 70 percent black community of Ferguson. After all, isn't that the type of white colonial mindset #BlackBrunchNYC is trying trying to fight?

If you can't laugh at what 2015 America represents, you have no hope of surviving its collapse.

For a society that bases the pursuit of yoga and brunching as worthwhile endeavors is one deserving of collapse.

Facing the Future

via Radix Journal

Richard Spencer
Fundraising is certainly not my favorite task. Indeed, I often wish I had a team of elves to do it for me. Every Christmas morning they would leave shiny gold bars under the tree, and we’d all be free of worry. 

Alas, growing up means putting aside childish things—and doing the things that are important and necessary. Fundraising is just that. NPI and Radix simply cannot complete our projects—and start new ones—without raising money during Yuletide.

And there are silver linings. For one thing, with this year’s campaign, you get something in return, beginning with books. And giving to something you care about is meaningful and inspiring in itself. It’s a chance to do something, even if it’s in a small way. Moreover, the turn of the year gives us a chance to reflect on what we’ve accomplished and think about where we want to go in the future.

Our movement has a tendency to get caught up in gloom and doom . . . but one unequivocal accomplishment is the blooming of a thousand flowers of what I’ve called the “alt Right.” (Indeed, the expanse that’s taken place in just the five years since I founded AlternativeRight.com has been tremendous.) There is more media revolving around European identity, traditionalism, and the study of human biodiversity than ever before. Much of it is of high quality. And we are able to communicate with each like never before—and able to understand each across the national lines that divided us over the past century.

But as a thousand flowers bloom, there remains a certain emptiness.
Anonymity and privacy—the ability to mask our identities online and read and think what we want—are things we should defend fanatically.

That said, we’re not going to change the world sniping on comment boards, nor will we as a collection of pseudonymous blogs.

We need a real movement. And real movements are lead by those who are willing to risk something, willing to suffer, willing to stand firm when in the right, willing to speak truth to power and face the consequences, and wiling to be happy warriors.

Over the past few months, I’ve received quite a few messages of sympathy and support for my arrest and imprisonment in Budapest this fall, for what can only be described as “thought crimes.”

In truth, I look back quite fondly on my brief stint as a political prisoner.

First off, my suffering was not great. There was the sleep deprivation . . . getting marched around in handcuffs . . . being declared a “national security threat” . . . a prison cuisine that resembled a cross between gravy and cat food (I don’t know what it tasted like, as it inspired me to go on a hunger strike) . . . But at the end of the day, these were the experiences of a thought criminal in the Hungary of Viktor Orbán, not Béla Kun.

Secondly, despite it all, our gathering took place, thanks to the work of Jared Taylor and a small, dedicated group of supporters, who more than compensated for my absence. In other words, we won.

Thirdly, and most important, as our enemies attack us, we become more powerful. Unquestionably, our Budapest event brought more attention to our ideas and ideals than any other event over the past year (probably over the past five years). Much of that attention was negative or hysteric, as would be expected. Some of it was sympathetic or expressive of understanding. In some cases, sympathy was wrapped up in hysteria. Quite a few learned of the existence of a movement for European identity through our perseverance.

If we’re going to have a serious movement—one that challenges the current dispensation in the most radical manner—then some of us are probably going to get arrested.

Our movement excels at analyzing the world. We need institutions that are working to change the world. NPI, Radix, and everything we do will be at the center of that effort.

Oswald Spengler & the Faustian Soul of the West, Part 2

via Counter-Currents

Kant and the “Unsocial Sociability” of Humans

I ended Part 1 asking who are these characters with proud aristocratic souls so different from the rather submissive, slavish souls of the Asiatic races. A good way to start answering this question is to compare Spengler’s Faustian man with what Immanuel Kant says about the “unsocial sociability” of humans generally. In his essay, “Idea for a Universal History from a Cosmopolitan Point of View,” Kant seemed somewhat puzzled but nevertheless attuned to the way progress in history had been driven by the fiercer, self-centered side of human nature. Looking at the wide span of history, he concluded that without the vain desire for honor, property, and status humans would have never developed beyond a primitive Arcadian existence of self-sufficiency and mutual love:

all human talents would remain hidden forever in a dormant state, and men, as good-natured as the sheep they tended, would scarcely render their existence more valuable than that of their animals . . . [T]he end for which they were created, their rational nature, would be an unfulfilled void.

There can no development of the human faculties, no high culture, without conflict, aggression, and pride. It is these asocial traits, “vainglory,” “lust for power,” “avarice,” which awaken the otherwise dormant talents of humans and “drive them to new exertions of their forces and thus to the manifold development of their capacities.” Nature in her wisdom, “not the hand of an evil spirit,” created “the unsocial sociability of humans.”

But Kant never asked, in this context, why Europeans were responsible, in his own estimation, for most of the moral and rational progression in history. Separately, in another publication, Anthropology from a Pragmatic Point of View (1798), Kant did observe major differences in the psychological and moral character of humans as exhibited in different places on earth, ranking human races accordingly, with Europeans at the top in “natural traits”. Still, Kant never connected his anthropology with his principle of asocial qualities.

Did “Nature” foster these asocial qualities evenly among the cultures of the world? While these “vices” — as we have learned today from evolutionary psychology — are genetically-based traits that evolved in response to long periods of adaptive selective pressures associated with the maximization of human survival, there is no reason to assume that the form and degree of these traits evolved evenly or equally among all the human races and cultures. It is my view that the asocial qualities of Europeans were different, more intense, strident, individuated.

Indo-European Aristocratic Lifestyle

I believe that this variation should be traced back to the aristocratic lifestyle of Indo-Europeans. Indo-Europeans were a pastoral people from the Pontic-Caspian steppes who initiated the most mobile way of life in prehistoric times starting with the riding of horses and the invention of wheeled vehicles in the fourth millennium BC, together with the efficient exploitation of the “secondary products” of domestic animals (dairy products, textiles, harnessing of animals), large-scale herding, and the invention of chariots in the second millennium. By the end of the second millennium, even though Indo-Europeans invaded both Eastern and Western lands, only the Occident had been “Indo-Europeanized.”

Indo-Europeans were also uniquely ruled by a class of free aristocrats. In very broad terms, I define as “aristocratic” a state in which the ruler, the king, or the commander-in-chief is not an autocrat who treats the upper classes as unequal servants but is a “peer” who exists in a spirit of equality as one more warrior of noble birth, primus inter pares. This is not to say that leaders did not enjoy extra powers and advantages, or that leaders were not tempted to act in tyrannical ways. It is to say that in aristocratic cultures, for all the intense rivalries between families and individuals seeking their own renown, there was a strong ethos of aristocratic egalitarianism against despotic rule. A true aristocratic deserving respect from his peers could not be submissive; his dignity and honor as a man were intimately linked to his capacity for self-determination.

Different levels of social organization characterized Indo-European society. The lowest level, and the smallest unit of society, consisted of families residing in farmsteads and small hamlets, practicing mixed farming with livestock representing the predominant form of wealth. The next tier consisted of a clan of about five families with a common ancestor. The third level consisted of several clans — or a tribe — sharing the same. Those members of the tribe who owned livestock were considered to be free in the eyes of the tribe, with the right to bear arms and participate in the tribal assembly.
Although the scale of complexity of Indo-European societies changed considerably with the passage of time, and the Celtic tribal confederations that were in close contact with Caesar’s Rome during the 1st century BC, for example, were characterized by a high concentration of economic and political power, these confederations were still ruled by a class of free aristocrats. In classic Celtic society, real power within and outside the tribal assembly was wielded by the most powerful members of the nobility, as measured by the size of their clientage and their ability to bestow patronage. Patronage could be extended to members of other tribes and to free individuals who were lower in status and were thus tempted to surrender some of their independence in favor of protection and patronage.

Indo-European nobles were also grouped into war-bands. These bands were freely constituted associations of men operating independently from tribal or kinship ties. They could be initiated by any powerful individual on the merits of his martial abilities. The relation between the chief and his followers was personal and contractual: the followers would volunteer to be bound to the leader by oaths of loyalty wherein they would promise to assist him while the leader would promise to reward them from successful raids. The sovereignty of each member was thus recognized even though there was a recognized leader. These “groups of comrades,” to use Indo-European vocabulary, were singularly dedicated to predatory behavior and to “wolf-like” living by hunting and raiding, and to the performance of superior, even superhuman deeds. The members were generally young, unmarried men, thirsting for adventure. The followers were sworn not to survive a war-leader who was slain in battle, just as the leader was expected to show in all circumstances a personal example of courage and war-skills.

Young men born into noble families were not only driven by economic needs and the spirit of adventure, but also by a deep-seated psychological need for honor and recognition — a need nurtured not by nature as such but by a cultural setting in which one’s noble status was maintained in and through the risking of one’s life in a battle to the death for pure prestige. This competition for fame among war-band members (partially outside the ties of kinship) could not but have had an individualizing effect upon the warriors. Hence, although band members (“friend-companions” or “partners”) belonged to a cohesive and loyal group of like-minded individuals, they were not swallowed up anonymously within the group.

The Indo-European lifestyle included fierce competition for grazing rights, constant alertness in the defense of one’s portable wealth, and an expansionist disposition in a world in which competing herdsmen were motivated to seek new pastures as well as tempted to take the movable wealth (cattle) of their neighbors. This life required not just the skills of a butcher but a life span of horsemanship and arms (conflict, raids, violence) which brought to the fore certain mental dispositions including aggressiveness and individualism, in the sense that each individual, in this male-oriented atmosphere, needed to become as much a warrior as a herds-man.

The most important value of Indo-European aristocrats was the pursuit of individual glory as members of their warbands and as judged by their peers. The Iliad, Beowulf, Song of Roland, including such Irish, Icelandic and Germanic Sagas as Lebor na hUidre, Njals Saga, Gisla Saga Sursonnar, The Nibelungenlied recount the heroic deeds and fame of aristocrats — these are the earliest voices from the dawn of Western civilization. Within this heroic ‘life-world’ the unsocial traits of humans took on a sharper, keener, individuated expression.

What about other central Asian peoples from the steppes such as the Mongols and Turks who produced a similar heroic literature? There are a number of substantial differences. First, the Indo-European epic and heroic tradition precedes any other tradition by some thousands of years, not just the Homeric and the Sanskrit epics but, as we now know with some certainty from such major books as M. L. West’s Indo-European Poetry and Myth, and Calvert Watkins’s How to Kill a Dragon: Aspects of IE Poetics (1995), going back to a prehistoric oral tradition. Second, IE poetry exhibits a keener grasp and rendition of the fundamentally tragic character of life, an aristocratic confidence in the face of destiny, the inevitability of human hardship and hubris, without bitterness, but with a deep joy.

Third, IE epics show both collective and individual inspiration, unlike non-IE epics which show characters functioning only as collective representations of their communities. This is why in some IE sagas there is a clear author’s stance, unlike the anonymous non-IE sages; the individuality, the rights of authorship, the poet’s awareness of himself as creator, is acknowledged in many ancient and medieval European sagas (see Hans Gunther, Religious Attitudes of the Indo-Europeans [1963] 2001, and Aaron Gurevich, The Origins of European Individualism, 1995).

Nietzsche and Sublimation of the Agonistic Ethos of Indo-European Barbarians

But how do we connect the barbaric asocial traits of prehistoric Indo-European warriors to the superlative cultural achievements of Greeks and later civilized Europeans? Nietzsche provides us some keen insights as to how the untamed agonistic ethos of Indo-Europeans was translated into civilized creativity. In his fascinating early essay, “Homer on Competition” (1872), Nietzsche observes that civilized culture or convention (nomos) was not imposed on nature but was a sublimated continuation of the strife that was already inherent to nature (physis). The nature of existence is based on conflict and this conflict unfolded itself in human institutions and governments. Humans are not naturally harmonious and rational as Socrates had insisted; the nature of humanity is strife. Without strife there is no cultural development. Nietzsche argued against the separation of man/culture from nature: the cultural creations of humanity are expressions or aspects of nature itself.

But nature and culture are not identical; the artistic creations of humans, their norms and institutions, constitute a re-channeling of the destructive striving of nature into creative acts, which give form and aesthetic beauty to the otherwise barbaric character of natural strife. While culture is an extension of nature, it is also a form by which human beings conceal their cruel reality, and the absurdity and the destructiveness of their nature. This is what Nietzsche meant by the “dual character” of nature; humans restrain or sublimate their drives to create cultural artifacts as a way of coping with the meaningless destruction associated with striving.

Nietzsche, in another early publication, The Birth of Tragedy (1872), referred to this duality of human existence, nomos and physis, as the “Apollonian and Dionysian duality.” The Dionysian symbolized the excessive and intoxicating strife which characterized human life in early tribal societies, whereas the Apollonian symbolized the restraint and re-channeling of conflict possible in state-organized societies. In the case of Greek society, during pre-Homeric times, Nietzsche envisioned a world in which there were no or few limits to the Dionysian impulses, a time of “lust, deception, age, and death.” The Homeric and classical (Apollonian) inhabitants of city-states brought these primordial drives under “measure” and self-control. The emblematic meaning of the god Apollo was “nothing in excess.” Apollo was a provider of soundness of mind, a guardian against a complete descent into a state of chaos and wantonness. He was a redirector of the willful and hubristic yearnings of individuals into organized forms of warfare and higher levels of art and philosophy.

For Nietzsche, Greek civilization was not produced by a naturally harmonious character, or a fully moderated and pacified city-state. One of the major mix-ups all interpreters of the rise of the West fall into is to assume that Western achievements were about the overcoming and suppression of our Dionysian impulses. But Nietzsche is right: Greeks achieved their “civility” by attuning, not denying or emasculating, the destructive feuding and blood lust of their Dionysian past and placing their strife under certain rules, norms and laws. The limitless and chaotic character of strife as it existed in the state of nature was made “civilized” when Greeks came together within a larger political horizon, but it was not repressed. Their warfare took on the character of an organized contest within certain limits and conventions. The civilized aristocrat was the one who, in exercising sovereignty over his powerful longings (for sex, booze, revenge, and any other kind of intoxicant) learned self-command and, thereby, the capacity to use his reason to build up his political power and rule those “barbarians” who lacked this self-discipline. The Greeks created their admirable culture while remaining at ease with their superlative will to strife.

The problem with Nietzsche is lack of historical substantiation. The research now exists to add to Nietzsche the historically based argument that the Greeks viewed the nature of existence as strife because of their background in an Indo-European state of nature where strife was the overriding ethos. There are strong reasons to believe that Nietzsche’s concept of strife is an expression of his own Western background and his study of the Western agonistic mode of thinking that began with the Greeks. One may agree that strife is in the “nature of being” as such, but it is worth noting that, for Nietzsche, not all cultures have handled nature’s strife in the same way and not all cultures have been equally proficient in the sublimated production of creative individuals or geniuses. Nietzsche thus wrote of two basic human responses to the horror of endless strife: the un-Hellenic tendency to renounce life in this world as “not worth living,” leading to a religious call to seek a life in the beyond or the after-world, or the Greek tragic tendency, which acknowledged this strife, “terrible as it was, and regarded it as justified.” The cultures that came to terms with this strife, he believed, were more proficient in the completion of nature’s ends and in the production of creative individuals willing to act in this world. He saw Heraclitus’ celebration of war as the father and king of the whole universe as a uniquely Greek affirmation of nature as strife. It was this affirmation which led him to say that “only a Greek was capable of finding such an idea to be the fundament of a cosmology.”

The Greek speaking aristocrats had to learn to come together within a political community that would allow them to find some common ground and thus move away from the “state of nature” with its endless feuding and battling for individual glory. There would emerge in the 8th century BC a new type of political organization, the city-state. The greatness of Homeric and Classical Greece involved putting Apollonian limits around the indispensable but excessive Dionysian impulses of barbaric pre-Homeric Greeks. Ionian literature was far from the berserkers of the pre-Homeric world, but it was just as intensively competitive. The search for the truth was a free-for-all with each philosopher competing for intellectual prestige in a polemical tone that sought to discredit the theories of others while promoting one’s own. There were no Possessors of the Way in aristocratic Greece; no Chinese Sages decorously deferential to their superiors and expecting appropriate deference from their inferiors.

This agonistic ethos was ingrained in the Olympic Games, in the perpetual warring of the city-states, in the pursuit of a political career and in the competition among orators for the admiration of the citizens, and in the Athenian theater festivals where a great many poets would take part in Dionysian competitions. It was evident in the sophistic-Socratic ethos of dialogic argument and the pursuit of knowledge by comparing and criticizing individual speeches, evaluating contradictory claims, collecting out evidence, competitive persuasion and refutation. And in the Catholic scholastic method, according to which critics would engage major works, read them thoroughly, compare the book’s theories to other authorities, and through a series of dialogical exercises ascertain the respective merits and demerits.

In Spengler’s language, this Faustian soul was present in “the Viking infinity wistfulness,” and their colonizing activities through the North Sea, the Atlantic, and the Black Sea. In the Portuguese and Spaniards who “were possessed by the adventured-craving for uncharted distances and for everything unknown and dangerous.” In “the emigration to America,” “the Californian gold-rush,” “the passion of our Civilization for swift transit, the conquest of the air, the exploration of the Polar regions and the climbing of almost impossible mountain peaks” — “dramas of uncontrollable longings for freedom, solitude, immense independence, and of giant-like contempt for all limitations.” “These dramas are Faustian and only Faustian. No other culture, not even the Chinese, knows them” (335-37).

The West has clearly been facing a spiritual decline for many years now as Spengler observed despite its immense technological innovations, which Spengler acknowledged, observing how Europe, after 1800, came to be thoroughly dominated by a purely “mechanical” expression of this Faustian tendency in its remorseless expansion outward through industrial capitalism with its ever-growing markets and scientific breakthroughs. Spengler did not associate this mechanical (“Anglo-Saxon”) expansion with cultural creativity per se. Before 1800, the energy of Europe’s Faustian culture was still expressed in “organic” terms; that is, it was directed toward pushing the frontiers of inner knowledge through art, literature, and the development of the nation state. It was during the 1800s that the West, according to him, entered “the early Winter of full civilization” as its culture took on a purely capitalistic and mechanical character, extending itself across the globe, with no more “organic” ties to community or soil. It was at this point that this rootless rationalistic Zivilisation had come to exhaust its creative possibilities, and would have to confront “the cold, hard facts of a late life. . . . Of great paintings or great music there can no longer be, for Western people, any question” (Decline of the West, Vol. I: 20-21; Vol II: 46, 44, 40).

The decline of the organic Faustian soul is irreversible but there is reason to believe that decline is cyclical and not always permanent — as we have seen most significantly in the case of China many times throughout her history. European peoples need not lose their superlative drive for technological supremacy. The West can re-assert itself, unless the cultural Marxists are successful in their efforts to destroy this Faustian spirit permanently through mass immigration and miscegenation.

The Obituary of Democracy

via BNP News

Alexander Tytler
In 1887 Alexander Tytler, a Scottish history professor at the University of Edinburgh, had this to say about the fall of the Athenian Republic some 2,000 years prior

“A democracy is always temporary in nature; it simply cannot exist as a permanent form of government. A democracy will continue to exist up until the time that voters discover that they can vote themselves generous gifts from the public treasury. 

From that moment on, the majority always votes for the candidates who promise the most benefits from the public treasury, with the result that every democracy will finally collapse over loose fiscal policy, (which is) always followed by a dictatorship.”  
 
“The average age of the world's greatest civilizations from the beginning of history, has been about 200 years.  During those 200 years, these nations always progressed through the following sequence: 

From bondage to spiritual faith; 
From spiritual faith to great courage;
From great courage to liberty;
From liberty to abundance;
From abundance to complacency;
From complacency to apathy;
From apathy to dependence;
From dependence back into bondage."

Britain’s state in the cycle of democracy has reached an advanced stage, with its status lying between the “apathy and dependency” phase of Professor Tyler's definition of democracy.

If this analysis was applied to the United Kingdom the timelines would probably look something like this:





Let’s hope that Professor Tytler is wrong in his analysis on the cycle of democracy, and that Britain can find another way of continuing the process of democracy other than a return to bondage.